Monthly Archives: December 2006

Impact Factors! Hirsch, Erdős and Pauling

Having spent 2 hours tidying CML Schema over a flaky CVS connection to sourceforge, I need some relaxation. So, after my disillusionment with the accuracy of citation metrics, I was spooking around Wikipedia and came across the h-index ( suggested … Continue reading

Posted in general | 3 Comments

Open Data in psychology

Peter Suber has posted (in Open Access News) A call for data sharing in psychology A fair share, Nature, December 7, 2006. An unsigned editorial. Excerpt: In psychology there is little tradition of making the data on which researchers base … Continue reading

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The most cited chemistry articles??

In my last post ( Assessed by Robots and citation Quiz) I argued that our careers are now in the hands of the publishing industry - they provide the numerical metrics and based on this the funders decide whether we … Continue reading

Posted in general, open issues | 2 Comments

Assessed by Robots and citation Quiz.

Jim Downing delicioused me the following link from the UK HEFCE. We are now going to be assessed by robots. (Since I am promoting the concept of robot readers of journals I can hardly complain). Skim the following (which has … Continue reading

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Open Access in Science - 1

I have been thinking about Open Access (and Open Data) since I ran into misunderstandings about what is an Open Access journal. As a result I have asked for clarification on one of the most prominent OA mailing lists and … Continue reading

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Licenses?!

Chris Rusbridge - who directs the UK Digital Curation Centre - has made an excellent comment on my post Molecules? Does “Open Access” help or hinder Open Science? I’m confused! Peter says “BOAI permits commercial re-use; MDPI does not.” But … Continue reading

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Molecules? Does "Open Access" help or hinder Open Science?

"Open Access" is often taken to imply certain rights. In fact it is more frequently a fuzzy term whose precise interpretation is unclear and sometimes even counterproductive to Open Science. (I accept this is a provocative statement, so read on...:-). … Continue reading

Posted in chemistry, open issues | 8 Comments